Monday, May 22, 2017

Saying I Do by Tracey Alvarez #NewRelease #Romance


Release Date: May 15, 2017
Genre: Contemporary Romance

Joe Whelan was fooled once on the way to the altar, and the Irish doctor isn’t about to be an eejit over a woman again. Especially not one who witnessed his broken-hearted humiliation years ago. He won’t be swayed by the sparks that fly whenever his eyes meet MacKenna’s or distracted by her sweet kisses. The only thing Joe cares about is preventing his sister from making the biggest marital mistake of her life.

MacKenna Jones loves a good wedding—so long as she’s sewing the bride’s gown, not walking down the aisle herself. Falling for Joe Whelan’s sexy bedside manner wasn’t on the cards, neither was a seven-day road trip with him to Las Vegas, the Marriage Capital of the World. When the stakes are so high, will these two gun-shy cynics ever say I Do?

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Do I Really Need An Editor? #writing #selfpublishing

As I talked about in last month's blog post, Self-Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing - 3 Major Differences, when you self publish editing your novel is all up to you. There isn't a publisher with a team of editors and cover designers. That's all on you, the author.

There is a huge debate, and I do mean HUGE, in the self publishing community as to whether or not an author needs to hire a professional editor. I'm of the opinion that hiring an editor is a must. It's not something you should do, but something you owe to not only your readers but yourself as well.

So why don't some writers hire editors? 


The two main reasons I hear are:

1) They are two expensive. And 2) They will alter my words and then they won't be mine anymore.

Editors do cost money, sometimes a good amount of money. For a 100,000 word manuscript you will normally be looking at paying somewhere between $500-$1,000 depending on the editor you choose to use.

To put this in perspective,

- If you sold your book for $2.99 on Amazon, you'd need to sell 478 copies just to cover the cost of editing if your editing cost you $1,000.

- If you sold your book for $3.99, you'd need to sell 358 copies.

- If you sold your book for $4.99, you'd need to sell 287 copies.

Also, keep in mind this is only what you'd need to sell to cover editing costs. This doesn't include the cost of your cover, formatting, or any marketing you choose to do.

So why spend the money? Why pay someone else for something you could just do yourself?

To put it simply, quality and professionalism. Now, there are probably a few authors that could, and maybe can, edit their own manuscripts, however they are in the minority. Most writers have read over their work so many times while writing it that they either see things that aren't there or miss things that are. There's also the fact that it really is a good idea to have another set of eyes on your manuscript. Something you may think makes perfect sense may in fact have everyone else scratching their head.

For example, I started reading a book recently where the heroine ended up marrying the heroes best friend because when she found out she was pregnant five years before the hero said he didn't want to be a father. As I began reading, I started noticing a few things. The conversations were unnatural and didn't flow well. There were also issues with the pacing. One day the heroine goes from crazy mad at the hero for leaving them high and dry five  years before to being ready to jump into bed with him the next. But what really had me scratching my head was the backstory itself. Halfway through the book (where I finally gave up) we still didn't know exactly how everything went down five years before and how she ended up marrying the heroes best friend. At one point it sounded like the hero 'called in a favor', and then at another part it sounded more like the heroine had approached the friend when the hero wouldn't 'step up.' There was definite confusion, which all could have been worked through with a good editor.

But what about editors changing your words so they don't feel like you anymore?

It's true. There are editors out there who do this. I had one once who completely rewrote the sample I sent her to the point where it didn't sound like me or my characters. She and I did manage to make it through the manuscript we were working on after I sent her a strongly worded email basically telling her to knock it off, but I swore I'd never work with her again.

A good editor should be looking for grammar, spelling, formatting, and other errors along with plot holes and inconsistencies. They should also be looking at how your book flows. Is there a lot of information thrown in that isn't really needed to move the story along? Does something happen where it seems like everything makes sense to the characters but the reader is left feeling as though they're missing something? These are all things an editor SHOULD be doing.

So that brings us back to why I think authors need to hire a professional editor. In a nutshell, if you're asking someone to pay for a product you've created, then you should be presenting them with a finished product. It's sort of an unspoken agreement between buyer and seller. You wouldn't go into a store and buy half a candy bar.

And while I understand that creative things such as writing aren't as subjective as a candy bar, it is a product and if you're asking people to spend their hard earned money on it then they deserve to receive a product that was polished and ready for sell.


 

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Burning Desires Erotic Ebook Giveaway


40 Stories That Will Turn Up the heat.



This weekend only you can download 40 Erotic Romance and Erotica novels for FREE. 

Click HERE to find your next sexy read. 

Friday, May 5, 2017

Now Available for Pre-order - Saying I Do by Tracey Alvarez #Romance


Marriage and happily-ever-after are for suckers…


Joe Whelan was fooled once on the way to the altar, and the Irish doctor isn’t about to be an eejit over a woman again. Especially not one who witnessed his broken-hearted humiliation years ago. He won’t be swayed by the sparks that fly whenever his eyes meet MacKenna’s or distracted by her sweet kisses. The only thing Joe cares about is preventing his sister from making the biggest marital mistake of her life.

MacKenna Jones loves a good wedding—so long as she’s sewing the bride’s gown, not walking down the aisle herself. Falling for Joe Whelan’s sexy bedside manner wasn’t on the cards, neither was a seven-day road trip with him to Las Vegas, the Marriage Capital of the World. When the stakes are so high, will these two gun-shy cynics ever say I Do?



Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Wedding Dreams: 20 Delicious Nuptial Romance Books #NewRelease


Release Date: April 18, 2017
Genre: Contemporary Romance


**You are invited to the weddings of your dreams** 

Twenty award-winning, USA Today and International best-selling authors have come together to bring you over 3,000 pages of love, lust, and lusciously sexy men.

From sweet second chance romances to bad boys, BBWs, and brides looking for revenge, this is a perfect read for anyone who enjoys Romance or Women’s Fiction. These pages are packed with cozy romances, thrilling international and holiday adventures, and sweet heart-melting stories. Our authors bring you everything from hot cowboys to rockstar romances, elegant weddings to nuptial disasters, and blushing brides to bold women, all in a delightful celebration of love.

You’re in for a wild, passionate ride on a breathtaking voyage to make your heart soar. This box set will leave you craving all things marital and wishing the honeymoon would never end.

Heat level: sweet to sensual

Buy It Now

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Missing The Point by PJ Fiala #NewRelease #Romance


Sometimes, being on the opposite side of the track, gives you a better view.

Sam McKenzie has everything he needs in his professional life. Bluegrass Security is going strong, he just purchased a home for the first time in his life, he even got himself a dog. Personally, however, life was a bit unsettled. His growing crush on Stevie Jorgenson was unrequited – he just didn’t know why. She seemed to enjoy spending time with him, he’d caught her staring more than once, but yet, she seemed wary to take it to the next level.

Stevie Jorgenson had worked her entire life trying to step from the shadow of her wealthy family, including the family horse business. Excelling at the police academy and then making detective in Chandler County had been hard work. Now, her growing attraction to Sam McKenzie was beginning to shade her with its shadow. The trouble was his biggest client was her father’s rival in business and that could make things messy. The other issue was his client was also a dirty dealer and she had to uphold the law. How can they make it on opposite sides of the track?


Sunday, April 16, 2017

Self-Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing - 3 Major Differences

Last Saturday I sat on a panel at the Ohioana Book Festival called Publishing: Let's Count The Ways. There were four authors and we'd all published both traditionally through a publisher and self published our own books. It turned out to be an amazing panel and what I took away from it was that a lot of people have questions about self publishing. Some don't even know where to start.

So, with that in mind, I'm going to be writing a series of blog posts to hopefully help some of you out there who are thinking about self publishing. There's a lot to know if you choose to go the self publishing route and I don't claim to know it all, but hopefully I'll be able to share some of my knowledge.

Self Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing


You've written your novel, so now what? Do you find an agent? A publisher? Or do you self publish?

The answer isn't as straight forward as you'd think. In fact, it takes a fair amount of research, and to be honest, a little soul searching to decide which publishing option is right for you. Below are three of the main differences between self publishing and traditional publishing.

1) Genre. Some genres sell more ebooks than paperbacks. Romance, for example. This makes self publishing extremely attractive to many romance writers these days. When 90% of your sales are ebooks, it isn't as important to get a physical copy of your book into book stores.

But with other genres, young adult for example, paperbacks still outsell ebooks. That makes having your books in stores an important factor, which is less likely to happen if you're not with a traditional publisher.

Research your genre of choice and find out how most of your potential readers are buying their books. This might effect which publishing option you choose.

2) Choice. Before you sign with a traditional publisher, make sure you read and understand your contract. Most authors give up any say in the cover, title, and even editing decisions when it comes to their manuscript. It's best to know what to expect going in.

If you choose to self publish, you have complete and total control. This can be a good thing, or it can be disastrous. Cover, title, editing...all of it is up to you.

3) Cost. One of the advantages to traditional publishing is that the publisher covers the cost of publishing the book. They pay for the cover design, the editing, formatting, and usually some of the marketing. Depending on the publisher and the contract, sometimes the author is even given an advance. The publisher is making an investment in the author and the book.

With self publishing, the author has to cover all the cost associated with publishing and marketing. This can run anywhere from several hundred dollars to several thousand. Instead of a publisher investing in the author and their book, the author themselves are doing the investing.


Did this blog post help answer any of your questions? If you're already published, are you traditionally published or self published? Do you agree with what I said above? Let me know in the comments.